Monday, August 25, 2014

MTR #2 - 5°C White Loaf (5度C冰种白土司)

Does this bread look cute?

I made this 5C white loaf on Thursday (14 Aug) and I have to wait till now before I can sit down, organize my thoughts and my hand-written notes and pen down the bread recipe. What a hectic week I had, we went camping the weekend of 15/16 Aug and the kids were thrilled but hubby and I were dead tired! 

First, I have to thank Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House for introducing the 5C bread to me. If you have never heard of 5C, do not be confused with the 5C which a lot of Singaporeans used to talk about in the past - Cash, Car, Credit Card, Condo, Country Club membership. No, this 5C refers to 5 degrees celsius. So the 5C bread is a 5 degrees celsius refrigerated dough starter bread (5度C冷藏液种) introduced by a Taiwanese baking book called 面包教室之5度C冰种的美味.

And what's so special about this 5C bread? Well, like most asian sweet breads such as Yvonne C's Hokkaido Milk Loaf (tangzhong water roux) and Alex Goh's sweet bread dough, this bread requires a starter dough, which has to be made in advance, proofed at room temperature for 1 hour and then immediately stored in the fridge at 5 degrees celsius for 16 to 18 hours. If you are familiar with asian sweet breads, you will know that the Hokkaido Milk Loaf uses a 65C 汤种 tangzhong water roux as dough starter, whereas Alex Goh's sweet bread is made using an overnight scalded dough starter. The 5C dough starter is different from the 2 above-mentioned dough starters as it does not involve heating the dough to 65C or scalding it with boiling water, instead it involves the usage of yeast. So it is more like a sponge dough starter. What you do is, you mix water with bread flour and yeast, proof at room temp for 1 hour and store in the fridge overnight. Then the next day when you wanna make your bread, just take the required amount from the dough starter stored in the fridge. So that was exactly what I did. :)


So what is the result? Pictures speak louder than words, just see how soft the bread is in the pictures. It was so soft that I had to bring out the "expert" (my bread/meat slicing machine bought in ALDI Belgium) in order to slice the loaf. As I had a machine to help me, I calibrated the thickness to 0.8cm, since I prefer thinly sliced breads than thickly sliced ones. By the way, I said earlier we went camping during the weekend of 15-17 Aug. What happened was, I made this bread on 14 Aug, finished most of it on the same day, and sealed the rest in a plastic bag, and conveniently forgot about it after I came home. Surprise surprise! The bread was still soft and fluffy the following Tuesday 19 Aug by the time I discovered it. So it was good for 5 days at room temp of 20 degrees celsius! Did I eat it? Of course not, I just touched it to feel how soft it still was. Being the generous housewife, I gave the bread to my remaining chicken to console her for the loss of her dear companion. One of my 2 chickens had died due to old age (>3 years) over the weekend. It is actually good news for me as it means I can get new chickens to lay more eggs since my chickens are so old that they are on strike most of the time!


Back to this 5C bread, this is actually a recipe I saw in a FB group, adapted from the book I mentioned above. It is a modified recipe, I have tried to trace it to the original recipe in the book but I could not find a match, so I decided to call it a white loaf. Pls note that although the ingredients were sourced from the fb group, the method (BM and oven version) was written by myself. 


Ingredients adapted from Fiona Lee's recipe

How to made 5C Dough Starter
300g bread flour
300g water (some say cold water, I added water at room temp, not lukewarm)
1g or 1/3 tsp instant yeast (1 tsp=3g)

Mix all 3 ingredients together, put it in a clean container, cover and proof at room temp for 1 hour, then place it in the fridge for at least 16 hours. I used a very big container and so you don't really see the rise in volume, plus the fact that my room temp was very low at only 20C, hence it gave the impression that the dough starter did not rise much during the 1st 1 hour. However pls note that the dough starter is ready to use once you see bubbles on the surface. I kept it in the fridge for exactly 16 hours.




How to make Main Dough
Ingredients A (dry ingredients)

330g bread flour
20g milk powder
60g fine sugar
4g or 4/3 tsp instant yeast (1 tsp = 3g)
3g or 1/2 tsp salt (1 tsp = 5.5g) *

*I added salt although it was not stated in this modified recipe. The recipes in the book however do include salt.

Ingredients B (wet ingredients)
200g of 5C dough starter (after 16 hrs in fridge)
120g milk (cold from fridge)
1 egg (60g)

Ingredients C (fat)
40g butter (to be added last, after rough dough is formed, about 5 min after start of kneading)


Method
(Note that I made the entire bread in my BM including the proofing and final baking, but I have also written down the steps for baking in the oven for those who does not have a BM.)


1. Prepare the 5C dough starter at least 16 hrs in advance, place it in an airtight container with sufficient room for it to expand, and chill it in the fridge overnight.

2. First place the wet ingredients (Ingredients A) into the bread machine or stand-mixer with dough hook, followed by the dry ingredients (Ingredients B). Make sure that you set the salt, sugar and yeast apart, the salt and sugar should be at separate corners, dig a hole in the flour mixture and add in the yeast in the centre. Only add in the butter (Ingredient C) when a rough dough is formed. Knead until the dough can be stretched into a thin stretchable membrane with smooth edges around the holes, that is it must be able to pass the windowpane/membrane test.

(A) Steps for Bread Machine
1. I was using Primo bread machine which has a "Sweet" mode (number 5). I first pressed "Sweet" and let it knead for 10 min and pressed stop. Then I re-pressed "Sweet" again (Sweet, Light Crust, 700g) and let it complete the entire cycle which took 2 hrs 50 min. The "Sweet" mode will knead for the 1st 10 min, rest for 5 min, knead again for another 20 min, then followed by proofing and finally baking. So I actually let the BM knead for 10 + 30 min. Based on my experience with my BM, at least 40 min is required for such breads.

2. Immediately remove from BM once the time is up and cool it on a cake rack before slicing. This bread can be kept for a few days as long as you seal it in clingwrap or ziploc bag and then in another plastic bag or airtight container. The bread will stay soft for as long as 5 days, as what I have discovered.



(B) Steps For Oven
1. 1st Proofing - Cover the dough with greased clingwrap and proof in a warm place for 40 min or until doubled in volume. 

2. Punch Down - On a generously floured table top, grease your hands, and punch down the dough to release air, then divide the dough into 6 pieces of 150g each, cover with greased clingwrap and rest for 20 min

3. Shaping - Flatten each piece of dough, roll it out and roll into a swiss roll, cover and rest for another 20 min. Flatten and roll into swiss roll again, place all 6 pieces into a 900g pullman tin. Or you can put 3 pieces each into two 450g pullman tins.

4. Proof until 80% and close the lid of the pullman tin.

5. Bake in preheated oven at 210C for 30 min.





I am submitting this post to "My Treasured Recipes #2 - Dough Starter Breads (Aug/Sept 2014)" hosted by myself Miss B of Everybody Eats Well in Flanders and co-hosted by Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House.

Also linking this post to Little Thumbs Up (Flour) organized by Doreen from My little favourite DIY and Zoe from Bake For Happy Kids, hosted by Diana from The Domestic Goddess Wannabe at this post

Also linking this post to Cook-Your-Books #15 hosted by Joyce of Kitchen Flavours

And to YeastSpotting.



Friday, August 22, 2014

MTR #2 - Tangzhong Ham & Cheese Loaf (汤种火腿起士土司)


I made this soft and fluffy tangzhong ham and cheese loaf last Thursday, it was such a lovely bread and I really love its texture and flavour.  Such a delicious savoury combination - grated cheese, ham and garlic sauce, I am sure you will fall in love at the first sight and after the first taste. 

I baked it just in time before my kiddies and hubby came home at 5pm. Since dinner was not yet ready, I quickly offered them the bread and it was finished in a jiffy, 5 minutes and the whole loaf was gone! It was actually quite a small loaf. OMG, I took such a long time to prepare and bake and yet it was gone in 5 min, not that I am complaining though! :)


Recipe adapted from a Taiwanese chinese baking book well-known for its Hokkaido Milk Loaf recipe ~ 65C 汤种面包 by Yvonne C 陈郁芬

Ingredients A (dry ingredients)
171g bread flour
45g low protein flour *
22g fine sugar
2g or 1/3 tsp salt (1 tsp = 5.5g)
4.5g or 1.5 tsp instant yeast (1 tsp = 3g)

* I used cake flour, you can use plain flour

Ingredients B (wet ingredients)
63g water
34g egg (1/2 egg) at room temp
54g tangzhong dough at room temp

Ingredients C
11g unsalted butter at room temp.

Fillings
grated cheese for pizza (Boni Special Mix - Affligem/Gouda/Cheddar) 
ham
pepper (omitted)
 
Toppings  
grated cheese for pizza
garlic sauce (can be replaced with mayonnaise or tartar sauce)


Method
1. Prepare the tangzhong dough in advance (click HERE for how to prepare tangzhong dough), transfer it into a clean bowl and cover it with clingwrap sticking onto the surface of the tangzhong to prevent it from drying up. (Note that the tangzhong dough can be chilled in the fridge for 2 - 3 days until the mixture starts to turn greyish.)

2. First place the wet ingredients (Ingredients A) into the bread machine or stand-mixer with dough hook, followed by the dry ingredients (Ingredients B). Make sure that you set the salt, sugar and yeast apart, the salt and sugar should be at separate corners, dig a hole in the flour mixture and add in the yeast in the centre. Only add in the butter (Ingredient C) when a rough dough is formed. Knead until the dough can be stretched into a thin stretchable membrane with jagged edges around the holes. (The dough was pretty sticky, so I kneaded about 45 min. I used the dough function of my BM, let it run 20 min, pressed stop and start again, another 20 min, stop/start again, and a final 5 more min. Total 45 min.)

3. 1st Proofing - Cover the dough with greased clingwrap and proof in a warm place for 45 min or until doubled in volume. (Since the weather was very cold, I left it to proof in the oven with lowest heat turned on.)

4. Punch Down - On a generously floured table top, grease your hands to punch down the dough to release air, then cut the dough into 3 pieces of 120g each. Cover and rest for 15 min. (The weight of dough was 382g, divided by 3 = 127g per piece).

5. Shaping/Resting - Flatten and roll each piece into oval shape, add in a piece of ham and sprinkle some grated cheese on top, then roll it up like a swiss roll, and slice each roll into 2, so you will get 6 rolls. Place the 6 rolls into a greased 450g pullman tin. (The bread tin must be greased since the book has indicated to line the tin with baking paper. I made a mistake in placing the fillings. The ham and grated cheese should cover the whole length of the rolled out dough before rolling up.)


6.  2nd Proofing - Cover the rolls with greased clingwrap and proof until the tin is 70% full. (I left it to proof in the oven with lowest heat turned on and it took me about 1 hour in cold summer.)


7. Apply a layer of garlic sauce (or mayo or tartar sauce) on top of the loaf and sprinkle grated cheese generously. (Original recipe used mayo and added sliced onions and chopped spring onions which I omitted.)

8. Bake in a preheated oven at 180C for about 35 min or until golden brown. (The book indicated top heat 150C and bottom heat 180C for 35 min, so I placed the bread tin in the lower shelf such that the top would reach the middle of the oven.)


By the way, if you are new to my blog or have not visited recently, pls be informed that I am now holding a second blog-hop My Treasured Recipes MTR #2 in Aug and Sept, featuring dough starter breads. You are welcome to join in the blog-hop from now till end September. More details to be found HERE.


  

I am submitting this post to "My Treasured Recipes #2 - Dough Starter Breads (Aug/Sept 2014)" hosted by myself Miss B of Everybody Eats Well in Flanders and co-hosted by Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House.

Also linking this post to Little Thumbs Up (Flour) organized by Doreen from My little favourite DIY and Zoe from Bake For Happy Kids, hosted by Diana from The Domestic Goddess Wannabe at this post

Also linking this post to Cook-Your-Books #15 hosted by Joyce of Kitchen Flavours

And to YeastSpotting.




Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Hokkaido Milk Loaf (Straight Dough Method) using Bread Machine

I have made Hokkaido Milk Loaf quite a few times using the Tangzhong method but I have never tried the Straight Dough method, so I finally decided to try it last week. It is funny because I actually did the Straight Dough method for Hokkaido Wholemeal Milk Loaf before I attempted the same method for the White Loaf recipe, I call the Wholemeal Loaf the Hokkaido Wholemeal Milk Loaf that can do yoga, because it was so soft it looked as if it was doing yoga! In fact, I did 2 versions for the Wholemeal Loaf which you can see here and here


What I like about the Straight Dough method is that it is so simple, no need to prepare the Tangzhong or Water Roux in advance, just dump everything into the Bread Machine, go surf FB and wait 2 hours 50 min, tick tock tick tock. The BM will do everything for you, and the bread is just as good. Life is so simple, how I wish every bread is as easy as this, haha. Then I can just sit back, relax and read a book or watch TV. When the time is up, just open the BM and I can enjoy my bread with homemade kaya and some expresso coffee...




Here is the recipe for this Hokkaido Milk Loaf (Straight Dough Method) using Bread Machine


Ingredients for 1 small loaf
270g bread flour
30g cake flour or low-protein flour
15g milk powder (Nestle low fat milk powder)
5g instant yeast (1 tsp = 3g)

40g fine sugar
4.5g salt (1 tsp = 5.5g)

1/2 egg (30g)
125g fresh milk
75g whipping cream or heavy cream (can replace with plain/greek yoghurt)


Method
1. Put everything into your bread machine and press "Sweet" mode, "Light" crust, and "700g". Each BM is different so choose the options according to your BM. (My bread machine has indicated it will take 2h 50 min.  However note that you should choose "Light" crust instead of "Medium" or "Dark" since the crust turned out to be nicely brown and crispy even though I chose "Light". If you are using the same BM as mine, it is advisable to press "Dough" mode to knead for 10 to 20 min before pressing "Sweet" mode, reason being the total kneading time for "Sweet" mode is only 30 min, which is not sufficient for this bread.

2a. If you don't like to use BM for baking, press the "Dough" function, let it run for 20 min, press stop and re-press "Dough" function again for another 20 min. Total 40 min of kneading at least. You should knead until the dough can pass the windowpane test, which means the dough can be stretched into a thin membrane without breaking. Remove it when kneading is completed, grease your hands and shape it round, cover with greased clingwrap or damp kitchen towel and let it proof 2 times for 1 hour each or until doubled in volume. After the 1st proofing, punch down the dough to release air, shape it round, cover and proof a 2nd time for another 1 hour. Then bake in a greased bread pan or 450g pullman loaf pan and place in preheated oven at 340F / 170C for 40 min or until it turns golden brown. The bread should be placed one shelf lower than the middle shelf so that the top of the bread reaches the middle height of the oven. (Note: You may like to refer to my post on the Hokkaido Milk Loaf Tangzhong method for a detailed step by step recipe on how to shape and bake in the oven.)

2b. If you don't have a BM, you can use a stand-mixer with dough hook to knead until the dough is smooth and elastic and passes the windowpane test, about 40 min for me. Then follow the instructions as per step 2a to continue to bake in the oven.

Note that the marking on the bread was due to my cooling rack. I should not have inverted it on the cooling rack because it left such an ugly marking.

Notes:
- If you are using BM to knead, remember to scrap the sides of the BM bowl using a rubber spatula to make sure all the ingredients are nicely incorporated into the dough. Same goes for stand-mixer.

 - The milk, whipped cream and egg should be at room temperature if you are using stand-mixer. If you are using BM, it's not necessary since the BM generates sufficient heat to warm up the ingredients during kneading but I did warm up my milk (cold from the fridge) briefly in microwave just to be on safe side.

- If you are using delayed timer function in BM, make sure you set the sugar, salt and yeast apart and don't mix them together, the yeast should also be separated from the liquid ingredients with a barrier of flour because you want the yeast to stay dry until the machine starts its cycle. It doesn't matter if you are using the BM right away.

Good to know:
 bread machine baking tips from King Arthur Flour


I am submitting this post to YeastSpotting.

Also linking this post to Little Thumbs Up (Flour) organized by Doreen from My little favourite DIY and Zoe from Bake For Happy Kids, hosted by Diana from The Domestic Goddess Wannabe at this post.

This post is also linked to the event, Little Thumbs up organised by Doreen from my little favourite DIY and me, Bake for Happy Kids, hosted by Diana from Domestic Goddess Wannabe at this post.
- See more at: http://www.bakeforhappykids.com/#sthash.OAjui5ra.dpuf
This post is also linked to the event, Little Thumbs up organised by Doreen from my little favourite DIY and me, Bake for Happy Kids, hosted by Diana from Domestic Goddess Wannabe at this post.
- See more at: http://www.bakeforhappykids.com/#sthash.OAjui5ra.dpuf
This post is also linked to the event, Little Thumbs up organised by Doreen from my little favourite DIY and me, Bake for Happy Kids, hosted by Diana from Domestic Goddess Wannabe at this post.
- See more at: http://www.bakeforhappykids.com/#sthash.OAjui5ra.dpuf

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Rice Cooker Matcha Green Tea Cake (again)


I have been feeling very lazy these few days, after returning from our vacation in beautiful Switzerland, I just don't feel like doing anything else. It's already 2nd week of August, and there are not many days left of our 2-month summer school holidays...actually whether holiday or not, doesn't make any difference to me, I am a full-time housewife, I have to WORK 24x7...

Anyway, here is the Rice Cooker Green Tea Cake I baked in a disposable paper mould last Friday. This mould is 6 cm tall and 15 cm in diameter. Posting it now otherwise my backlogs will just get piled up and sooner or later I will forget again. Recipe is adapted from my RCC #3. I took about 10 min longer, which was 70 min to cook the cake, since the cake batter was not in direct contact with the rice cooker pot, hence it took slightly longer than usual. 

Here are some pictures of the cake.


The advantage of using a paper mould in the rice cooker is that, you can make a smaller but taller cake, and this is especially useful for people whose cakes get burnt easily. However, I would like to caution that I have only tried it in Toshiba which is a fuzzy logic rice cooker with non-stick pot, I cannot and will not guarantee that it will work in other rice cookers. You have to try it out yourself, and if your rice cooker goes on strike, pls do not blame me OK? I am only sharing my recipes FOC and out of goodwill, I am not responsible for what happens in your kitchen. :)



Sunday, August 3, 2014

My Treasured Recipes #2 - Dough Starter Breads (Aug - Sept 2014)

How time flies, our very first blog-hop My Treasured Recipes #1 featuring Alex Goh recipes has come to an end on 31 July and now we are into our second blog-hop for Aug and Sept. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the bloggers who have contributed their recipes to MTR #1 and I hope they would continue to lend their support to the future blog-hops that we organize. 



So what are we gonna do for the next 2 months? Initially I wanted to feature a very famous bread book by a Taiwanese author. But because of copyrights concerns, I have decided not to feature any books in future, lest I get into any trouble with any authors or publishing firms (I genuinely intend to feature and help promote the sale of the book(s), but they may think otherwise). Instead my future blog-hops will be based on themes that I myself would like to explore in detail, themes that have not been covered by other blogs, recipes that i consider as "treasured recipes". 

Hence, after some careful thoughts, I have decided that MTR #2 will be based on Dough Starter Breads. What are Dough Starter Breads? They are breads that require a dough starter or a pre-ferment/mother dough, it can be a tangzhong/water roux dough starter (made famous by Yvonne C's 65C Tangzhong book), a gelatinised/scalded dough starter (made famous by Alex Goh), a 17 hour preferment dough (I did this before but can't remember the source), a 5C overnight dough starter, a sourdough starter, a poolish dough starter, a natural yeast dough starter, and many more.  

So if you are into making breads, whether you are a beginner or an expert, feel free to join our blog-hop and share with us your dough starter breads. 

Here are some of the rules and conditions for this blog-hop:
1) This blog hop shall last for 2 months from 3 Aug 2014 to 30 Sept 2014. Your post must be a current post within the specified date range. You may submit more than 1 entry.

2) Pls indicate that you are submitting your post to "My Treasured Recipes #2 - Dough Starter Breads (Aug/Sept 2014)" hosted by Miss B of Everybody Eats Well in Flanders and co-hosted by Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House.

3) Your bread recipe has to involve a dough starter, it can be any dough starter, not limited to the ones I have listed above. Participation is very simple, just click on the "Add Your Link" button and submit through the InLinkz tool.


For a start, I am gonna post a recipe that I have completely forgotten about. This bread was from Alex Goh's Magic Bread book and was actually done way back in July. It comes in handy now, since I have just returned from vacation and I am still busy unpacking, and haven't started my bread machine yet :)



Wholemeal Roll adapted from Alex Goh's Magic Bread


Ingredients A (Dough Starter)
80g bread flour + 55g boiling water

Method
1. Add boiling water to bread flour, mix well to form dough, then cover it with clingwrap and set aside to cool a while before placing in the fridge (not freezer) for at least 12 hours. 

Ingredients B
180g bread flour
140g wholemeal flour 
1 tsp molasses (replaced with honey)
20g sugar
8g salt
5g instant yeast

Ingredients C
190g cold water

Ingredients D
25g unsalted butter


Method
2. (After 12 hours) Mix ingredients B until well-blended. Add ingredients C and knead to form rough dough. Add in ingredients A(cut into small pieces) and knead until well-blended.

3. Add in ingredients D (cut into small pieces) and knead to form elastic dough. (I kneaded using my bread machine dough cycle, 2x20 min, total 40 min).

4. Cover with greased clingwrap and leave it in a warm place to proof for 45 min or until doubled in volume.

5. Divide the dough into required weight (40g each), mould it round by pulling and pinching the sides of the dough together so that one side is smooth and round and let the dough ball rest on the pinched side. Let it rest for 10 min.

6. Roll it flat into rectangle and roll it up like a  swiss roll. (I only did half of them as rolls, I did the other half as round buns).

7. Place into a greased pan and let it proof for another 45 min.

8. Bake in a preheated oven at 200C for 12 to 15 min.


I am submitting this post to "My Treasured Recipes #2 - Dough Starter Breads (Aug/Sept 2014)" hosted by myself Miss B of Everybody Eats Well in Flanders and co-hosted by Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House.

Also linking this post to Little Thumbs Up (Flour) organized by Doreen from My little favourite DIY and Zoe from Bake For Happy Kids, hosted by Diana from The Domestic Goddess Wannabe at this post.

Also linking this post to Cook-Your-Books #15 hosted by Joyce of Kitchen Flavours



Wednesday, July 23, 2014

How to Make Chicken Floss Using Bread Machine



This is the chicken floss that I made using bread machine last Friday, following a recipe shared by a lady from a FB group. This recipe is really simple and fuss-free, there is no human intervention required, what's more, it really tastes and looks exactly like the real meat floss from the famous Mei Zhen Xiang 美珍香, no kidding! I was still worrying about what to do since the meat floss we brought back from Singapore was nearly finished, I was really frugal in eating the meat floss as it was so precious, I would only spoon out a little to put into my boy's porridge each time and I had to tell him repeatedly that this small packet has to be stretched a long way, since we have to wait another year before we can replenish our supplies from Singapore. So you can imagine my joy when this recipe just "dropped from the sky", and solved my problem. Haha, so happy that I know how to make chicken floss myself =D

So what I did was, I made some apple chicken soup for lunch, threw in 4 big chicken thighs, and after simmering for 2 hours, the chicken meat were so soft that they fell from the bones, then I drank the soup and reserved the chicken meat for making chicken floss. 


Recipe shared by Hui Ping Yi Yin, original recipe by Siew Moy Wong


Ingredients for original recipe 
400g pork, boiled and shredded
3.5 tbsp fish sauce
7 tbsp fine sugar
2 tbsp dark soya sauce
3 tbsp water

Ingredients for my adjusted recipe
300g chicken, boiled and shredded
2.5 tbsp fish sauce 
5 tbsp fine sugar
1.5 tbsp dark soya sauce 
2.25 tbsp water


Method
1. Place the deboned meat into a ziploc bag and press it flat. Add in all the seasonings into ziploc bag and mix well.



2. Add in the seasoned meat into the bread machine. Select Jam function (number 9, takes 1 hr 20 min per cycle) and do it 2 times/cycles, a total of 2 hrs 40 min. Note that for my BM, the jam function starts stirring continuosly 15 min after start and until 20 min before end, which means it stirred continuously for 45 min per cycle and 90 min in total.




See this is the finished product, my "BAHOO" done in a bread machine. Does it look like those sold in shops selling bak kwa? I think it does!



I had some chicken floss with the tiger bread we bought from the bakery, hmm simply delicious! 

Btw, I have a small announcement to make. The blog-hop event "My Treasured Recipes #1" featuring Alex Goh recipes is coming to an end at the end of July. After some consideration, I have decided not to do a blog-hop based on books, for fear of copyright infringements. My next blog-hop My Treasured Recipes #2 will be DOUGH STARTER BREADS. You are free to blog and join us if you have baked any breads using a dough starter, starting from 3 Aug to 31 Sep. :)

Monday, July 21, 2014

Party Cakes #5 - The Buttered Cat's Apple Crumble Tart


This is absolutely my favourite apple crumble tart, I call it the Buttered Cat's Apple Crumble Tart. Why? Because this recipe came from a friend of my sister, whose bakery is called The Buttered Cat. I have made this apple crumble tart 2 times in the past which I blogged about HERE but I have forgotten to document the recipe. This is my 3rd time making this tart, I made this tart together with 7 other cakes/tarts for last weekend's party and I MUST document it otherwise I am gonna forget the exact measurements for a 9-inch pie tin and then I have to crank my brain and do the math again. :)


This apple crumble tart may seem daunting, but if you follow the intructions carefully and if you do the apple filling 1 day in advance, you will find that it is actually not that difficult at all. It is perhaps a little tedious to prepare the apple filling, the pie crust and the streusel all by yourself, it may take you the whole afternoon if you do everything at one go, but I assure you that it is technically not difficult and when you get everything correctly done, you will feel a great sense of satisfaction, especially if the apple crumble tart turns out to be as good or even better than those served at cafes.


The original recipe was for 2 tarts, a 9-inch and a 6-inch, but I have adapted the quantities to suit a 9-inch tart only. Recipe adapted from the Buttered Cat's Apple Crumble Tar

Ingredients for Apple Fillings
7 apples about 800g, 175g sugar, 35g butter, 3/4 tbsp lemon juice (optional)


Ingredients for Pie Crust
140g plain flour, 70g butter (cold from fridge), 7g sugar, pinch of salt, 3/4 egg


Ingredients for Streusel
140g plain flour, 140g butter (cold from fridge) 


Method
1) To prepare the apple filling, peel and core the apples and cut them into small cubes. Then cook the cubed apples with the other ingredients, bring to boil, turn down the fire till the apples caramelise. You may prepare the apple filling a day in advance, cover it with clingwrap and store it in the fridge (Do not add water as the apples should be juicey and should emit moisture as you cook them. If you find that the apples emit too much juice, remove some of the juice so that the apples can brown faster.)




2) To prepare the crust, cut the butter into small cubes, the butter must be COLD from the fridge. Mix flour and butter by hand,  till soft and fluffy, then add the egg and consolidate the mixture into a ball of dough. Wrap the dough in clingwrap and place the dough in the fridge for at least 30 min to harden.


3) To prepare the streusel or crumble topping, cut the butter into small cubes, the butter must be COLD from the fridge. You may rub in with your (cold) fingers, or use a knife to cut the butter through the flour, or use a food blender or cake-mixer to pulse the butter and flour, until it resembles bread crumbs.



ASSEMBLY

4) After 30 min, remove the dough from the fridge, flour the work surface generously, and roll out the dough evenly with a rolling pin until it is slightly bigger than a 9-inch pie tin. Grease and flour the base and sides of the pie tin then place the dough inside and use your fingers to press down and mould it into shape. Use a fork to prick holes all over the dough, then use a pastry brush to brush some egg white over the dough to prevent it from getting soggy.

5) Spoon the apple filling over the dough and use the back of a spoon to spread and level the apple filling.

6) Bake at 170C for 35 to 40 min. I baked mine at 170C for 40 min + extra 5 min for browning.



Notes:
- The almount of dough is just nice, so there is no margin for mistakes. Suggest increasing to 160g flour, 80g butter, 8g sugar, pinch of salt, 0.8 egg.
- The amount of streusel is far too much, and there is still a lot leftover, suggest reducing to 120g butter + 120g flour. 


Did not manage to snap a picture of the cross-section this time, but here is a picture I took from March 2013.



Sunday, July 20, 2014

Party Cakes #4 - Blueberry Streusel Cake


This was another 1 of 8 cakes which I baked for my baby's party on 12 July. I have already posted the orange cheddar cheese chiffon cake, the rice cooker blueberry jam cake and the orange butter cake earlier. I still have a few other cakes to post, including my favourite apple crumble tart and belgian rice tart. Alamak, so many backlogs!

This blueberry streusel cake was very well-received by the guests. Although it was a very flat cake (it was not intended to be a tall cake according to Joy Of Baking), it was packed with lots of blueberries, nearly 250 grams! Blueberry is a power fruit which contains lots of anti-oxidants, so I can say this is a very healthy wholesome cake, hopefully it takes away some of the guilt and health-consciousness of eating such pound cakes. :)


Recipe adapted from Joy Of Baking's Blueberry Cake, link with video.


Streusel topping to be sprinkled on top of the cake.

Cake batter.

Assembling the cake - first put some blueberries on top.

Before sending to the oven, sprinkle the streusel topping over the cake.

I followed the full recipe with very minor modifications
- I used 225g (less than 1 pack of 250g) instead of 480g of fresh blueberries. 
- I used a rectangular tin with the same surface area as a 8 inch (20x20cm) square tin as specified by the recipe.
- I baked on the middle shelf at 180C for 40 min, but lowered to 160C for extra 10 min, did not use aluminium foil to cover the cake, total baking time was 50 min.
- Note that the butter for the streusel topping has to be COLD from the fridge. You can use your fingers to do the rubbing-in together with the help of a knife to cut the butter through the flour, or you can use food processor to pulse the butter, flour and sugar. 

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