Monday, April 29, 2013

Pandan Kaya Bread



I baked this pandan kaya bread on 24 April, but I only have the time to post it up today. I better post it up before I get busier and busier. May is always a busy month for me, the kindergarden is holding mothers' day celebration where all mothers are invited, and there is my son's birthday, he is expecting me to bake him a big 3-dimensional tractor cake! Not to forget, I am hosting the Aspiring Bakers event #31 for May 2013, so this is gonna be an incredibly busy month starting 1 May. Hopefully I will get as many entries as I had last time for Aspiring Bakers #25, I am keeping my fingers crossed. Just a hint for those who has no inkling of what next month's event is about, it is about steamed baos/buns, but actually it is NOT all about steamed baos/buns. Just watch this space for more info coming up!


Now this will be the last part of my so-called "Pandan Everything Nice" series. I have made my own Homemade Pandan Kaya Jam, and baked my first Pandan Kaya Butter Cake, now it is time for Pandan Kaya Bread. This is a recipe that I chanced upon while searching for a bread recipe with kaya jam as a key ingredient.



Pandan Kaya Bread recipe, adapted from HouseOfAnnie, originally from Alex Goh's World of Bread

Ingredients A
300g bread flour
2 tsp instant yeast
1/2 tsp salt 
1/2 tbsp milk powder

Ingredients B
30g egg (1/2 of an egg since 1 average-sized egg weighs 55g)
60g or 3 round tbsp kaya *
1 tbsp fresh pandan juice + 1/4 tsp pandan paste **
105ml water

Ingredients C
20g shortening, cut into small pieces (can be replaced with butter)

Ingredients D
1/4 cup kaya for the filling ***

Ingredient E
1 egg for egg wash (or you may use the leftover egg from ingredient B)


* original recipe used 60g coconut milk but I replaced it with kaya jam.
** original recipe used only 1/2 tbsp fresh pandan juice while Annie used 1 tsp pandan paste. If you dun have fresh pandan juice, just use 1 tsp pandan paste will do.
*** original recipe used 130g raisins which I omitted

Crumble Topping
30g butter (cold from the fridge, cut into pieces)
30g sugar
60g plain flour




Method
1. Put A into a big mixing bowl and use a spoon to mix till well-blended.

2. Add B, and mix to form a rough dough.

3. Once a rough dough is formed, add C and mix to form a smooth dough. (I am using the dough mode of my bread machine to perform steps 2 and 3, mix for about 10 min.)

4. Put in a slightly-greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap or damp cloth and proof for about 50-60 min. (As the weather was not warm enough, I turned on my oven to the lowest temp, and let it proof for 1 hour).

5. After the 1st proofing, punch the dough to release the air and knead it a few times, then divide the dough into 15g each and shape into balls. (The weight of the dough was 587 grams, so I divided into 40 balls of roughly 15g each. Basically I cut the dough into 2 equal halves, and each half was further cut into 4 parts which were further cut into 5 equal pieces, that was how I got 40 small balls. The dough was not sticky at all and very easy to handle, there was no need to flour the work surface.)

6. Put half of the dough balls into a well-greased loaf pan, then add a layer of kaya and add the remaining dough balls and proof for 45 min. (I added only 2 tbsp of kaya which I later regretted, should have added more!  I used a big loaf tin about 15cm (W) x 30cm (L) x 10cm (H). But if you are using a 10cm x 20cm loaf tin, you will need 2 of them.)

7. To prepare the crumble topping, add 30g cold butter to a big mixing bowl, and add 30g sugar. Using a fork or using your fingertips (must be cold), mix the butter and sugar till it is well-mixed. Add 60g plain flour and again using your cold fingertips, rub the flour into the butter mixture until it resembles fine bread crumbs. Set aside or store in the fridge until your bread is ready.

8. After 2nd proofing of 45 min, brush with a layer of egg wash and sprinkle the crumble evenly on top. (Remember to brush with egg wash otherwise the crumble will not stick and will start falling apart when you invert the bread!)

9. Bake in a preheated oven at 175 degrees celsius for 25 to 30 min. (I baked mine in the lower half of the oven, not in the middle, as the top of the bread would be too close to the heating elements, and the bread was nicely baked with a golden crust after 30 min.)

10. Remove from oven and allow it to cool for a while. To unmould, use a knife to carefully run through the sides of the bread then invert it on a cooling rack.



Verdict:
- This was a very delicious sweet bread with an incredibly soft texture. Sweet due to the kaya, but the pandan flavour was too subtle for me. 1 tbsp fresh pandan juice alone definitely packed no punch for such a big bread, even with the addition of 1/4 tsp artificial pandan paste, there was not enough pandan flavour. I should have followed Annie's recipe and just use 1 tsp of pandan paste. I also kind of regretted not adding more kaya in between the dough balls. After adding 3 tbsp kaya in the beginning into the dough, I was running short of homemade kaya, so I couldn't add more than 2 tbsp kaya filling. Then I read the comments in Annie's blog and realised that she added 1/4 cup kaya, no wonder! The bread would definitely taste more heavenly if I was more generous with the kaya filling. :S

- My 4-year-old son (did you see him monkeying around in the fotos?) especially loved the crumble topping, and he called the bread a brood-cake (bread-cake), while my 14-mth-old daughter who could only manage a few sounds (of mama, papa, yee and ah) was pointing to the pandan kaya bread non-stop and savouring every single morsel of it. She saw the bread coming out fresh from the oven, lying on the table, and so she started walking around the table in circles, and smacking her lips at the same time. :)

This pandan kaya bread recipe is definitely a keeper for me, I am already thinking of how to tweak the recipe to come up with some other flavours. I would like to follow the original recipe, i.e. use 60g coconut milk in place of kaya and add 130g raisins which I omitted, and maybe add a layer of dessicated coconut or slabs of butter in between. Or I can also add 60ml of orange juice instead of coconut milk, omit the pandan juice/paste and use 1 tsp rum, add 130g raisins, and add a layer of orange marmalade in between the dough balls. This will become an orange rum and raisins loaf. :)


This post has been submitted to YeastSpotting.

6 comments:

  1. Hi Ms B,

    From your pictures of pandan bread, I see a cute face and lots of happiness and sunshines (from the bright reflection of the bread under the sunlight) from your kitchen.

    Sorry that I can't participate your AB event in May as I will be away more of this month.

    Zoe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Zoe,

      Yeah, that cutie face was that of my eldest son. I dun usually show pictures of myself or my family in my blog due to privacy reasons, but he was monkeying around in front of my camera, wanting to be in my pictures all the time. :)

      The sunlight shining on the bread was not from my kitchen, was taken in my garden, one of the rare times that the sun was shining in April this year. Thank god the weather is getting warmer these few days. :)

      No worries about not participating this time, there are always plenty of opportunities to participate in future. Hope you enjoy your holidays. :)

      Delete
  2. Very nicely done! I've put the link on our Facebook Fan Page :-)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Bee,
    Your Pandan Kaya bread looks so special.
    It is always feels so good when our kids enjoy our cooks or bakes. Dont you think so?? :D
    You are very creative with the orange marmalade and the rum.
    Now i am interested with your orange rum and raisin loaf ;D
    mui

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, sometimes I feel it's better to play around with an existing good recipe that you have good experience with, rather than try out new recipes which you are not familiar with. :)

      Delete

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